Royal City Carlson Wagonlit Travel's Blog

The Caribbean group of islands has always been a paradise destination for many retiree and couple vacationers, including thrill-seeking travelers.


Nonetheless, globetrotters who are on a shoestring budget should now rejoice as the Caribbean countries are already beginning to welcome independent travel through their ecotourism and backpacking travel options.

Be allured by the irrefutable beauty of these island nations in this short clip prepared by Jem Cresswell, and start planning your Caribbean itinerary as early as now!

 

With Beirut’s cultural life at its best, this capital city of Lebanon is now thriving in terms of its press, nightlife and theatres.

Travelers should now forget about the Lebanese Civil War as this remarkable city has now remodeled its nightlife districts, city center, pubs and marina so that it could once more reclaim its tourism glory.

Check out this short video arranged by 80Days, and witness a typical day in Beirut.

 

Destinations like the Kalahari Desert, Namib Desert, the Etosha National Park and the Fish River Canyon Park are among the many reasons travellers are flocking to Namibia. The ecotourism here is booming, as well as the extreme sports opportunities like sandboarding and 4X4ing. 

Joe Louw creatively compiled great clips from his travel in Namibia, and explains, “—travelling through Namibia searching for great photographic locations. A magical place!”

The Kalahari Desert

Video: SGT Argentina – Session 3 Snowboard With the accessibility to the grand Andes Mountain range, where numerous deluxe and economical ski resorts flock, it cannot be denied how Argentina should definitely be one of the destinations that every snowboarding aficionado/adventurous traveler should check out. read more

Poros is a Greek island-pair in the southern part of the Saronic Gulf.  It's a small space with a smaller local population, but with a big reputation for incredible sites and beautiful landscapes. 

There are two separate islands - Sphairia and Kalaureia, connected by a bridge over a narrow isthmus. Poros is full of rich, diverse vegetation, with a good road network and adequate tourist infrastruction. 

I came across this article by Cherina Hadley of QuietWanderings.com: "Why I am Dyring to Go Back to the Greek Islands." A fan of this place for many years, Poros holds some wonderful memories for her and she discusses why in her post. There are many things to love, but her passion is held by the food.

 

(Moussaka - lamb mince layered with potatos & eggplant, topped with bechamel sauce)

She also discusses the safety of traveling to Greece now, and many other insights - check out the full article!

When you're ready, contact us to start your next travel adventure! We have a lot of ideas for your summer. 

These smaller cities offer quite a bit to the traveller in their own right. Whether you're visiting for the crazy rugby scene or attending the Cheltenham Jazz Festival in May, you certainly won't run out of things to do.

Nor things to eat. There is a vibrant foodie scene in both of these cities that offers delicious, international cuisine at highly affordable prices.

In fact, Tony Naylor just wrote an article for the guardian.co.uk - Top 10 best budget restaurants in Cheltenham and Gloucester

Making the list are Vanilla of Cheltenham, a "smart basement restaurant," and Blue Thai Kitchen of Gloucester - "cheap, cheerful and, for the money, pretty good."

Check out his full list, and contact us to plan your trip

1. Take a canal cruise.

Put this beautiful city into perspective as you cruise through its criss crossing waterways.

 

2. Anne Frank House.

Relive the tale of a little girl who changed the world as you tour her home.
 

3. Rijksmuseum.

Home to some of the finest historical artefacts in the Netherlands you will be amazed how fantastic the vast collection is.
 

4. Take to the streets on a bike.

By far the best way to get around Amsterdam, you will be able to experience the preferred method of transportation by Amsterdam locals and tour the city in a different way.

 

5. Relax in a café.

One of the most popular things to do in Amsterdam, the café experience will enable you to embrace the culture and do some people watching.

 

6. Stroll around the city at night.

Illuminated bridges, picturesque architecture and cozy cafes enjoy!!

 

7. Red Light district.

Adults only- take a quick stroll through this area and experience something uniquely Amsterdam.

 

8. Heineken Museum.

Delve into the beer making process as well as sample the final product.

 

9. Vodelpark.

The largest park and most famous park in Amsterdam this area is bustling with performers and exhibitions.

 

10. Have and drink. 

With more than 1200 local pubs a bar crawl may be in order.


To plan your next trip, contact us at Royal City Travel!

There's a certain art form to packing: being able to bring as few clothes as possible that will cover you for your entire vacation, no matter what happens; choosing clothes that don't easily wrinkle or show stains; finding the right fabric for the temperature of your destination; the list goes on. 

I tend to be an overpacker, so whenever I can get my hands on super versatile clothing that I know I'll use over and over, I try to stock up.

ColoradoGal of TheVacationGals.com blog, wrote a great review for a wrap dress from GGO Clothing, made of 88% organic bamboo and 12% Lycra. Not only is it soft and wrinkle free, but it's "naturally antibacterial and wicks away moisture better than cotton."

Not to mention cute! Usually versatile clothing means utility, and utility doesn't often yell "travel glam." This dress is simple enough that you can dress it up or down, for a variety of occassions, and still look great. Plus the wrap-style works for many different body shapes. 

I agree with ColoradoGal though, in that I would probably layer a light tank or camisole underneath, unless I was going to the beach in the dress. 

Check out her full review here. Also, take a few minutes to poke around the GGO Clothing website, full of casual ready-to-wear items for women (and men!).

Before I answer that question, let me say that I love my iPhone and my MacBook Air. Everyday I am thrilled to find a new use, a new widget, a new app, a new feature that makes my life easier and more fun. I never take for granted how incredible this technology is and I can't wait to see what the future holds. 

That being said - I am very, very minimalist when it comes to technology and travelling. Maybe it's because I did for so long without a laptop or SmartPhone. Or maybe because part of me feels like these things can be more of a distraction than an aid. 

Another reason is that I don't want to risk my equipment getting stolen or broken while travelling. Plus a small map is much easier to carry around than a laptop. 

Perhaps the main reason is that I feel like I get a more authentic, visceral experience - it's just me and my wits, figuring out how to ride the subway or get to my hotel. For me, travelling is about being in the moment - not online.

Justin of GreatFamilyEscape.com writes,

"I travel to experience the new.  I travel to observe and take in what the world has to offer.  No doubt technology can help add to my perspective and improve my travels, but are these benefits enough to outweigh the distraction and inconvenience that modern technology can cause?

Do I really want to become reliant on a laptop that might break in the middle of nowhere and cause me to spend my travel funds and search for a replacement?"

What do you think? Do you travel with technology? How does it help you? Or do you leave it all behind? Why?

 

A trip to Rome is a trip of a lifetime. In between visiting the great museums, posing in front of the fountains for pictures and admiring the many historical and cultural sites, you'll be doing one of my favorite activities: eating. And boy, is it good. 

It also can be expensive. Especially in the more touristy areas, the food you're served doesn't do justice to the true flavors of Italy, particularly if you're given an English menu and bad service.

For tips on the best places to eat in Rome, check out Gisella Deputato of CNN's article, An Insider's Tasty Tips for Rome. She has a lot of great info and ideas that will make you hungry and itching to start your trip to this incredible city (let us help!). 

A trip to Hong Kong is quite the adventure. A vibrant modern city set amidst an ancient culture - it's truly a unique experience. 

I wanted to share this neat video of Hong Kong by 8 Pixels Productions. A beautiful collection of moving images of a summer Hong Kong trip. 

Get inspired and start your next trip today! 

Ah, the souvenir. Ah, the souvenir. Nothing brings you back to those life-affirming moments abroad like some good old-fashioned kitsch.

Even if photos are enough memento for you, it’s nice to bring home trinkets as gifts for family and friends. Here’s everything you need to know about finding, buying, and bringing back the best souvenirs during your travels. 

The Hunt
First off, don’t wait until last minute. I repeat - don’t put this off. You’ll wake up in the airport when you’re rushing through duty-free, wondering if Mom would want a carton of Marlboros. (Hint: She doesn’t.) Make a list of the people you’d like to bring stuff back for, and keep an eye out throughout your trip. If something just screams your sister, grab it right then.

Also, make sure you include gifts for yourself and others into your budget. You don’t want to end up skipping meals for snow-globes.

Think outside the box when you shop. Variations on basic items with unique or bizarre packaging make for fun (and inexpensive) gifts. Try to buy locally-made, artisan goods. It’s a simple way to support the local industry and take home an authentic cultural keepsake.

Shop in markets or other places that locals do. Museum gift shops - though on the more expensive side - usually offer a wide variety of art, books, jewelry, and other items that make for beautiful presents.

If you’re traveling with a friend, make a game out of hunting for the best souvenir. Go to a market and split up. Set a price limit and give yourselves 30 minutes. It’s a fun way to find some gems, and you can trade at the end.

Trade Souvenirs
Whether it’s a t-shirt from your alma mater or baseball cap of your favorite team, stuff with American slogans or brands are unique abroad and make for excellent trading materials.

Try to make a trade at a vendor’s stall or somewhere else you can haggle. Offer to switch your shirt out with that of someone you meet. This is a fun way to interact with locals, and either way, you’ll go home with a good story. I’ve also swapped (inexpensive) jewelry.

On The Cheap
For yourself, think maps, brochures, visitor guides and other promotional materials. You can often find these for free at tourism offices or museums, and many are beautifully printed on quality paper. I’ve cut pages out of museum guides and framed them for elegant wall decorations. You can also do this with postcards.

Other super cheap souvenirs include stamps, coins, and newspapers - even if you don’t speak the language it’s a cool way to wrap your gifts. And if you want to learn the language, newspapers are a terrific place to start.

Gifts from nature work too. I once gave someone polished stones I found along a beach that I had brought home and put in a glass jar. Dried flowers, seashells, and plants seeds are other good examples.

Pass the Food
Remember - everyones like food. And food is everywhere.

Bring back your girlfriend chocolates from Belgium, or your mom dried pasta from Italy. When I went to Colombia I made sure I brought back my highly caffeinated Dad some good Colombian coffee beans. Teas and spices work too, and they’re cheap and easy to pack.

Bringing It Back
Leave some empty room in your suitcase while you’re initially packing; remember, bags are weighed coming back too, so if you’re over the limit you could be looking at some hefty fees. Another idea is to pack an empty suitcase or duffel bag inside your luggage to later remove and fill with souvenirs.

However, if you want to stick to your backpack and plan to travel on for a while, ship your souvenirs back. It might even be cheaper than checking another bag.

Looking Looking for an amazing hot dog in South Florida? Arbetter Hot Dogs, located in the Westchester neighborhood of Miami, is the place to go.

With so many hoity-toity restaurants in Miami, it’s easy to forget that there are just as many regular, moderately-priced gems to be found. Arbetters Hot Dogs is most definitely one of those gems.

Located in the Westchester neighborhood, menu highlights include the amazing chili cheese fries, the absolutely delectable chili dog and the freakishly good corn dog. Be sure to tell the cashier that you "love Larry Byrd" for a free refill.

It's simple: if you're looking for great food on a budget, Arbetter Hot Dogs is the place to be. 

Let us know if you need help planning and booking your trip to South Florida! We can make it quick and easy, so no stress for you while you travel

Check out below some helpful hints on what to expect when visting Florence, Italy

 

Average Hotel Prices

Hostel $20-41 dollars USD

1 Star Hotel $44-100 dollars USD

2 Star Hotel $50-160 dollars USD

3 Star Hotel $65-230 dollars USD

4 Star Hotel $95-370 dollars USD

5 Star Hotel $250-650 dollars USD

Transportation

Taxi from airport to city center $37-40 dollars USD

Airport express train to city center $8 dollars USD

Train from Pisa airport to Florence $9 dollars USD

3KM taxi in Florence $9-16 dollars USD

Bus ride in Florence $2 dollars USD

Sightseeing Prices

Uffizi Museum $10 dollars USD

Accademia Gallery $10 dollars USD

Santa Maria del Fiore Cathedral climb $12 dollars USD

Average Food Prices

Breakfast $5-11 dollars USD

Lunch $8-15 dollars USD

Dinner $11-22 dollars USD

Beer $3-5 dollars USD

Wine $5-8 dollars USD

Weather

Hi Lo Rain

Jan 50 35 2.9

Feb 54 37 3.7

Mar 59 41 3.2

Apr 66 46 3.1

May 74 52 2.9

Jun 81 59 2.2

Jul 88 63 1.6

Aug 87 63 3.0

Sep 80 58 3.1

Oct 70 50 3.5

Nov 59 42 4.4

Dec 51 36 3.6

Oslo is a global city, with a large and varied number of cultural attractions. The local government invests large amounts of money in cultural installations, facilities, buildings and festivals in the city. There are many parks and seasites and museums, with regular opera performances and a thriving literature scene. 

Here are some ideas for your next trip!

1. Oslo City Hall (Oslo Rådhus), where the Nobel Peace Prize is presented annually.

2. Enjoy a cruise on the Oslo Fjord by tour boat or local ferry.

3. The top of the Holmenkollen Ski Jump provides superb views of the city and fjord.

4. The Kon-Tiki and FRAM Museums recall extraordinary sea voyages by famous Norwegians.

5. The Munch Museum (Munch-museet) exhibits from the thousands of paintings and prints that Edvard Munch left to the city of Oslo.

6. The National Gallery (Nasjonalgalleriet) houses the largest collection of painting and artwork in Norway, including Munch’s The Scream.

7. The Norwegian Folk Museum (Norsk Folkemuseum) offers a taste of historical life through the use of actors in period costume. 

8. Norwegian Resistance Museum (Norges Hjemmefront museet)

9. Vigelands Sculpture Park (Vigelandsparken) presents the works of Gustav Vigeland on a grand scale.

10. The Viking Ship Museum (Vikingskiphuset).

Book today with Royal City Travel!

For the ultimate in a getaway experience, one place we'd like to recommend is Tortuga Bay Private Beach & Vacation Villas. 

There's a reason this place is ranked #1 of 96 hotels in Punta Cana on TripAdvisor, a Travelers' Choice 2012 Winner, with reviews titled, "the height of relaxation" and "Tortuga Bay SECOND YEAR and still our favorite." 

What, exactly, is this place doing so right?

Well, according to their website, the AAA Five Diamond Awarded Tortuga Bay "offers responsible luxury, impeccable service and villas designed by th world-renowned Oscar de la Renta."

Here's a review from TripAdvisor:

"We do not often rate a hotel as excellent, but Tortuga Bay went beyond all expectations. The accommodations in individual beach-front villas were outstanding and the service was irreproachable. A personal "villa manager" is assigned to each room, who takes care of everything from booking tables, reserving a tennis court, renting bikes, setting up spa treatments, and making sure housekeeping only shows up when you are sure to be out of the room. The hotel was full the entire week we were there, but the pool and private beach were not the least bit crowded (usually it was just us and one or two other couples). It was supremely tranquil: no jet skis or motorboats to disturb the beach, and no car traffic around the property (all guests have their own golf cart to get around). There is one restaurant on site, and many others a short bike ride away. The entire staff, from the servers to the housekeepers, were remarkably friendly. It was one of the most serene vacations we have ever had. For those of you who have trouble "disconnecting", be aware that the hotel wifi is spotty."

Deeply infused with the local Dominican culture, with great care taken to practice sustainable development while still providing world-class service, Tortuga Bay is the premier Caribbean get-away location. 

Chase away those winter blues and take your loved one to a special vacation!

Contact Royal Travel to get started with your trip

Here's a great little video by geobeats with some helpful information for traveling. How to stay safe, where to shop, how to get around, what to order and more! 

Inspired yet?

Contact us at Royal City Travel to start your trip today!

We've put together a street food guide for Southeast Asia, one of our favorite travel destinations. This is a region where low prices do not mean low quality, and you can feast like a king or queen with a few dollars and some street smarts. 

Let's get started!

Temperature

Hot food should be served piping or steaming hot - not lukewarm. Fried is usually fine provided the oil looks like it has been recently changed.

As recommended by Phnomenon’s article, Food in Cambodia, stick to “drinking ice” - small, tubular pieces of ice - rather than the “cooling ice,” which comes in massive rectangular blocks that are then chipped down for your drink. The latter is where you’re more likely to pick up a microbe like Giardia.

Check to make sure your ice looks clean before drinking. In Cambodia, you can ask for anamay, which is “hygienic ice” that’s round with a hole in the center.

Avoid ice cream from street vendors, as it’s typically repeatedly unfrozen and re-frozen.

Another Cambodia recommendation (but probably true for most regions) is to go for food carts that are family-run. If more than one member of the same family works at the stall, likely the stall is lucrative enough to support the entire family - meaning it’s a top notch venue.

Spice
In Thailand, one dish you can’t miss is the Som Tam (papaya salad). It’s a sweet, sour, salty salad made from shredded green papayas, garlic, shrimp, tomatoes, peanuts and chili peppers.

As you can imagine, it’s super popular, and locals like it served spicy - and I meanspicy. Like many dishes you’ll try across Southeast Asia, the spice barometer is likely different than what you’re used to.

Play it safe. At least in the beginning, ask for your food served mild and work your way up.

Know When to Eat
Similar to the dining schedule in Mexico that's based on certain cultural nuances, in Southeast Asia there is a rhythm to how and when the food is served.

In Phnom Penh, the traditional rice and pork breakfast is served by 8:30am. Lunch starts at 12pm and runs until about 2pm. For both meals it’s a good idea to show up early, in order to eat fresh and avoid the dregs and rejects.

Once you’re there for a few days your tummy will sync up but until then, ask around and try to get a feel for the local schedule.

Take a Tour
Whether you’re still a little intimidated by all of the options, or just want some context for your food, a Walking Food Tour at the onset of your trip can set you up for successful food experiences for the rest of your stay.

Not only do you get to sample a wide array of food and drinks, both on the street and in restaurants, but you’ll learn some local history, food traditions, detailed dish descriptions, recommendations, and more.

You can find a Walking Food Tour in almost any major city. Here are some top picks:

Hoi An, Vietnam: The Last Great Taste of Hoi An: Understanding & Appreciating Vietnamese Foods in Hoi An

Bangkok, Thailand: Food Tasting & Cultural Walking Tours

Singapore: Joo Chiat / Katong Districts Food Walk

Jakarta, Indonesia: Culinary Food Tour of Traditional Street West Javanese Food

Culinary Tours by Globe Taste in Thailand, Cambodia & Laos

Know the Lingo
It’s common for food carts to serve only one dish, meaning that to order, all you’ll need to do is point and indicate how many servings you want.

Even if language isn’t your thing, a few words here and there will give you an edge when it comes to ordering, eating and enjoying the local fare. If you have food allergies or dietary preferences, this is a must.

For example, in Vietnam, any food with banh in the name means that it’s flour-based. And if you’re trying to order vegetarian, you’d say khong an thit - “don’t eat meat,” or, an chay - “vegetarian.”

Use Common Sense
We say this a lot, but that’s because ultimately it’s up to what you think is right and feel comfortable with.

Over the past couple of decades, there have been huge improvements in hygiene and sanitation standards across Southeast Asia.

Most of the street food comes from small stalls and vendors who have little space to refrigerate and little capital to invest, meaning they buy their ingredients fresh at the beginning of every day and serve until they run out.

These cooks have perfected their food and want it to be safe and delicious because that’s how they make their income. In places like Thailand, most people get at least one of their daily meals from a street cart, which creates competition among the vendors and a bigger, better selection for you.

Try to avoid carts stationed along the side of busy roads where traffic and wind can stir up dust. And consider using your own chopsticks - some vendors boil theirs to sterilize while others aren’t so hygienic.

More Resources
The Off Track Planet complete guide to Vietnamese Street Food

The Best of Singapore Street Food by Venere Travel Blog.

Q & A on Street Food in Hanoi, Vietnam by SavourAsia.

Guide to Eating Through Cambodia by Wanderfolly.

Thai Food Words.

 

For more information about food in Southeast Asia - or anything else - contact us at Royal City Travel!

"When preparing to travel, lay out all your clothes and all your money. Then take half the clothes and twice the money."

-- Susan Heller. 

This is probably one of my favorite travel quotes. I personally try to put all my spare cash into travel funds, and when I do travel I'm thrifty. 

However, the truth is that there are times when you're travelling when spending the little extra makes a HUGE difference. 

Just ask Reena Ganga of Wanderplex.com. Her article, When to break your travel budget, takes a good look at the experiences that are worth the extra money. 

Here's an excerpt:

"1. A cab from the airport after a super long flight. Sure you could take the subway, but if it’s going to take twice as long, require you to make a transfer while lugging all your bags, walk five blocks, and oh, it’s late and you’re knackered – it’s probably worth shelling out the extra money for the taxi."

What about you? What experiences or extras are you willing to stretch your travel budget for?

(Photo by Mukumbura)

P.S.

Remember - the easiest way to save money on your next trip, before you even leave, is to plan and book through Royal City Travel. We can set you up with an amazing travel deal, just contact us for more info

We all want the best for our children, and part of that is raising them to be global citizens, with a keen sense of tolerance and cultural awareness. So we read them books, take them to museums, and sometimes, bring them along on our travels to give them a bigger sense of the world. 

How will they respond though? Some kids LOVE traveling, can't get their bags packed fast enough. Others ... aren't as cooperative. Why? And what can we do?

Elaine Ee offers 7 Tips for Bringing Up Good Travelers on the CNN International Blog; specifically, "How to plant the seeds of good travel in your children, before they go on the road."

These tips are actually really helpful. Some of them hadn't even immediately occurred to me ("treat service staff with respect"). Check out the full list!

Another way to make travel with your children easier, is to book through Royal City Travel. We can take care of all the arrangements of your next trip, plus give you some tips on kid-friendly spots to visit. 

Contact us for more info!

Get Inspired. 

This video by youtube.com member kiendlam chronicles his journey across 17 countries, over 343 days, in 6237 photographs. 

From the video's description:

17 Countries. 343 Days. 6237 Photographs. One incredible journey. Follow the adventure at http://kienlam.net/around-the-world and http://kienlam.net

After I quit my job last year, I packed a bag, grabbed my camera and bought a one way ticket to London. 17 countries later, I compiled this time lapse of the many amazing places I came across.

Original Music: "Places and Faces" by William Lam. Will is an extremely talented musical composer whose range is barely touched in this composition he wrote specifically for the video. He's also my little brother. Visit http://kienlam.net to download the MP3.

The list of countries:

USA
England
France
Portugal
Spain
Morocco
Egypt
Turkey
Jordan
Thailand
Indonesia
Japan
Argentina
Uruguay
Chile
Bolivia
Peru

Technical Details:

Shot with a Panasonic Lumix GF-1, 20mm f/1.7 and 14-45mm f/3.5-4.5.

Photography and Video Edited with Lightroom, After Effects and Final Cut Pro.

Music composed in Logic Pro.

Special thanks to Dan Hirons, Joey Seich and Carol Trieu for all your help, support and patience.

To all my fellow travelers whose company made each step of the way all the more memorable and unique, I want you to know that however short an appearance you made in the video, you've left an impact far greater and long-lasting than the few seconds that each city appeared in the video.

To my family, thank you for bearing with me and worrying about my health and safety with every dodgy bus ride and new country I found myself in each day.

 

It's Your Turn.

It doesn't have to be 17 countries, but it is time to start your next journey. 

Make 2012 your year for adventure!

I know where I'm going in 2012!

Video by inspiredbyisland.com

"Iceland is more alive than ever, bursting with energy, activity and hospitality. Take a look for yourself..."

 

I really wanted to share the blog by Janice Waugh - "SoloTraveler". She writes as a woman in her golden years who in 2009 decided to experience the world again. Her blog is full of witty insight plus some great tips on places to visit, food to eat, sights to see. 

What I like best about her writing is her very positive, very contagious attitude that anything and everything is within your reach at any age. 

Below is an excerpt from her latest post, though I recommend you check into her website regularly to see what's she's up to. Right now her adventures have taken her to London. 

"... The latter is what I often feel when traveling solo. On the second day of my trip to London, navigating the Underground alone, I suddenly felt very capable. My confidence soared. For a moment (just a moment as I admit that it is a small accomplishment), I felt exhilarated.

When the announcement came on to “Mind the Gap” it occurred to me that there isn’t one. This feeling of soaring confidence is ageless. It is there to achieve for those in their twenties and those in their nineties. It helps us age brilliantly – at any age.

I wish it for you."

The next few weeks is the most wonderful time of year for many people - just maybe not for their cell phones. AVG Technologies, a leading provider of Internet and mobile security, released a new survey with some startling results.

The survey, "Lost in Transit," polled some 5,620 users around the world over the past year, and found that "35 percent of laptops and 38 percent of mobile phones are lost or stolen while in transit and that, alarmingly, 82% of lost or stolen devices are never recovered."

Given the high level of travel this time of year and the valuable data many of us store on our mobile devices, keeping them safe has never seemed more important. The last thing you want on a trip to Grandma's house is to lose your phone and worry about its return.

Using data from Lost in Transit, AVG compiled a list of tips to help keep mobile devices safe now and throughout the year. You can find the full list in the AVG press release on the Wall Street Journal: Holiday Travel is Risky Business for Mobile Devices.

Below is an excerpt, but definitely check out the rest of the article for more info!

"2. Use a password! According to Lost in Transit, 61 percent of lost smartphones are not password protected, giving thieves easy access to all of a consumer's personal information. Without exception, passwords should be mandatory operating procedure for smartphones, laptops, tablets and any other mobile device with valuable data."

This unique, glass buiding is an architectural masterpiece and home to one of the most popular restaurants in Prague. 

The Dancing House is located near the Vltava River, which along with the Prague Castle provides the space with beautiful views. Construction began in 1992 and was completed in 1996; since then the House has become a top tourist attraction in the city, and the very popular restaurant Celeste regularly draws in large crowds.

The building has a very modern and chic vibe and is centrally located, meaning you can plan a day trip around it and still see many other beautiful, historic buildings. 

The architects, Vlado Milunc and Frank O’ Gehry, originally named this building ‘Astaire & Rogers Building’ after the famous dance duo that inspired them.

Prague is an amazing city with so much to offer! Let us plan your next trip!