Royal City Carlson Wagonlit Travel's Blog

"When preparing to travel, lay out all your clothes and all your money. Then take half the clothes and twice the money."

-- Susan Heller. 

This is probably one of my favorite travel quotes. I personally try to put all my spare cash into travel funds, and when I do travel I'm thrifty. 

However, the truth is that there are times when you're travelling when spending the little extra makes a HUGE difference. 

Just ask Reena Ganga of Wanderplex.com. Her article, When to break your travel budget, takes a good look at the experiences that are worth the extra money. 

Here's an excerpt:

"1. A cab from the airport after a super long flight. Sure you could take the subway, but if it’s going to take twice as long, require you to make a transfer while lugging all your bags, walk five blocks, and oh, it’s late and you’re knackered – it’s probably worth shelling out the extra money for the taxi."

What about you? What experiences or extras are you willing to stretch your travel budget for?

(Photo by Mukumbura)

P.S.

Remember - the easiest way to save money on your next trip, before you even leave, is to plan and book through Royal City Travel. We can set you up with an amazing travel deal, just contact us for more info

Alex Vallis, Senior Digital Editor of Food & Wine Magazine, posted an article in the “Mouthing Off” column of the blog: 5 Signs You’ve Picked a Bad Restaurant is intended to prep diners of a slightly higher budget for choosing the right spot as the Fall high season for restaurant openings returns.

The list applies more specifically to upscale eateries but is practical enough for all diners to learn a thing or two. After all, if you’re going to splurge on a nice meal, you certainly want to get your money’s worth.

5. You’ve been ushered in off the street. 
“It’s unlikely that one restaurant on a touristy strip will be any different from the others just because an animated host told you how great it is. A similar phenomenon occurs with online deals: Ryan Sutton, a Bloomberg critic and the blogger behind The Bad Deal, compared buying these deals to ordering products from infomercials. If someone who you don’t know, whose opinions you aren’t familiar with, and who has a 100-percent bias is trying to convince you to eat at a particular restaurant, you might want to do a little more research before committing to a meal.”